Something brief and interesting perhaps

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Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Goose » Sat Jun 16, 2007 5:56 pm

Scramjet hits Mach 10 over Australia

* 13:34 15 June 2007
* NewScientist.com news service


A supersonic scramjet engine has been successfully launched from a test range in Australia. The Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) said the scramjet achieved reached 10 times the speed of sound during the test.

Scramjets are supersonic combustion engines that use oxygen from the atmosphere to burn onboard fuel. By contrast, conventional rockets carry their own oxygen to burn fuel. The hope is that scramjets can be made lighter and faster than oxygen-carrying rockets.

But mixing oxygen with a fuel in a supersonic airflow and then igniting it is tricky. The tests involved accelerating the scramjet to several times the speed of sound and switching it on.

A rocket carrying the HyCAUSE scramjet engine blasted off from the Woomera range in South Australia on Friday. It reached an altitude of 530 kilometres before re-entering the earth’s atmosphere where the scramjet engine was successfully ignited.
Successful test

HyCAUSE is the Hypersonic Collaborative Australia/United States Experiment – a collaboration between the DSTO and the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The ultimate goal of the tests is to design an engine that produces more thrust than drag.

"It looks like we've been very successful," said Steve Butler, a spokesman for the DSTO. "We've got to go away and collate the data, that will take a few weeks, but it looks very promising."

Aircraft flying at Mach 10 could cut travelling time between Sydney and London to as little as two hours.
Increased payloads

"This technology has the potential to put numerous defence and civilian aerospace applications within our reach during the next couple of decades," said Warren Harch, a scientist at the DSTO.

Butler said they could also slash the cost of sending satellites into space, because the weight saved by not carrying oxygen could be used to increase the payload.

Next year, the DSTO and the US Air Force begin a five-year programme testing scramjet technology at the Woomera range. A number of other countries including Italy and Japan are also developing scramjets.
Last edited by Goose on Sat Jun 16, 2007 5:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Goose » Sat Jun 16, 2007 5:58 pm

No.2Power-generating buoys shelter in the deep

* 14:00 14 June 2007
* NewScientist.com news service

They look a bit like underwater mines, but they have a far less sinister purpose – the first of these submarine wave-energy devices should sprout up off the UK coast in 2008.

AWS Ocean Energy has developed an underwater buoy that harnesses wave energy from 50 metres below the surface. The British company says that because the entire device is underwater, it does not suffer from storms in the way that other wave-power devices do, and will not interfere with shipping.

It will be anchoring its first five test buoys to the seabed in a test site off the Scottish coast next year.

Wave power is nothing new. Perhaps the best known wave-power device is Pelamis – a red, floating, snake-like system that undulates on the surface of the sea, harnessing the energy of waves as they articulate sections up and down (see Eel feel helps wave power go with the flow).
Pump action

But surface generators are very vulnerable to violent storms. AWS's device, which is made from the same materials that are used in the underwater sections of oil rigs, sits in the calm of deeper waters.

It harnesses wave energy at a distance, through the changes in pressure that waves generate by increasing and decreasing the water column.

The buoys are hollow and filled with a compressible gas that allows the top half of the buoy to move up and down. When a wave passes over them at the surface, the additional water stacked on top of the buoy increases the local water pressure, and the upper half of the device is pushed down.

Between waves, the water column is shorter, the pressure lower, and the upper-half rises. This wave-driven pump action is converted into electricity, which can be fed into the national grid.
Stormy seas

"A town with 55,000 inhabitants would need half a square kilometre of seabed covered with 100 buoys to power it," says Grey.

He adds that they could be effective in the North Atlantic, from Scotland down to Portugal, along the Pacific US shoreline, from San Francisco in the US up to Vancouver in Canada, along the coast of Chile, and even in South Africa and New Zealand.

But calmer seas, such as the Mediterranean do not have enough wave height to pump the buoy.
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Postby Guest » Sat Jun 16, 2007 6:18 pm

ZZZZZZZZZZZZ...wha...oh....zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Goose » Sat Jun 16, 2007 6:25 pm

Ok maybe i should have entitled it - interesting to me.......

Edit (maybe you'll like this one)


Shooting underwater

Conventional guns don't perform well underwater. In air, a rifle bullet might leave a gun's barrel at about 700 metres per second and have barely slowed down after 100 metres or more. The much greater drag in water means that bullets run out of steam within a few metres. So how to make a bullet fly through water?

Engineers can already do this with certain ultra-fast torpedoes. Gas expelled from around the tip of the torpedo as it moves through the water ensures that almost the entire body is enclosed in a bubble. This "supercavitation" slashes drag, creating an underwater missile capable of travelling at supersonic speeds. It has been used in the Russian high-speed Shkval rocket torpedo, for instance (New Scientist, 22 July 2000, p 26).

Now researchers at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, suggest that it might be possible to do the same with smaller projectiles - perhaps even bullets. Engineers Pavlos Vlachos and Chris Weiland have developed a way to wrap a projectile in a bubble from the moment it emerges from a gun. The trick - which they call instant supercavitation - is to inject a pulse of high-pressure gas into the water a fraction of a second before the projectile is fired. As the projectile passes through the bubble, it drags the gas with it. In tests the researchers found that this technique significantly improved a projectile's speed and accuracy.

There's another way to create supercavitating bullets, and the US navy is thinking about using it to create an underwater machine gun. According to a patent published in 2005, the Naval Undersea Warfare Center at Newport, Rhode Island, is interested in creating liquid projectiles fired by an underwater weapon. This high-power water pistol resembles an internal combustion engine in which the piston is replaced by a reservoir of water. When fuel and air are injected into the space above the water and ignited, a jet of water is forced out through a narrow nozzle (see Diagram). The liquid "bullet" this generates travels fast enough to force water away on either side of it, creating a cavity of vapour that gives it a range of up to 50 metres. To make the liquid projectiles more deadly, the patent suggests adding sand, grit or metal powder to the water in the reservoir.
Last edited by Goose on Sat Jun 16, 2007 6:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Guest » Sat Jun 16, 2007 6:37 pm

Goose I gotta ask.
Bored Much?
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Goose » Sat Jun 16, 2007 7:30 pm

Just a tad
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Guest » Sat Jun 16, 2007 7:56 pm

Mate the Internet was created for porn.
Go look at some. :wink:
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Postby Grom » Sat Jun 16, 2007 8:00 pm

That scram jet shit's pretty interesting, I've been on the Woomera range once or twice, firing off anti aircraft missiles. Those old rocket launch pads are pretty interesting to suss out.
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Postby slaine » Sat Jun 16, 2007 9:45 pm

great stuff , wished i could get my head around it
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Goose » Wed Jun 27, 2007 11:20 am

Coins are much sought-after in India's north-east

Millions of Indian coins are being smuggled into neighbouring Bangladesh and turned into razor blades. And that's creating an acute shortage of coins in many parts of India, officials say.

Police in Calcutta say that the recent arrest of a grocer highlights the extent of the problem. They seized what they said was a huge coin-melting unit which he was operating in a run-down shack.

The grocer confessed to melting down tens of thousands of Indian coins into razor blades which were then smuggled into Bangladesh, police said.

"Our one rupee coin is in fact worth 35 rupees, because we make five to seven blades out of them," the grocer allegedly told the police. "Bangladeshi smugglers take delivery of the blades at regular intervals."

Out of circulation

Police say that initially the smugglers took coins into Bangladesh and then melted them down, but as the scale of the operation has increased, more and more criminals in India are melting them down first, and then selling them as razor blades.

To deal with the coin shortage, some tea gardens in the north-eastern state of Assam have resorted to issuing cardboard coin-slips to their workers.

The denomination is marked on these slips and they are used for buying and selling within the gardens.


Notes are more common than coins in Guwahati

The cardboard coins are the same size as the real ones and their value is marked on them.

"We will commit an offence if these cardboard slips go out, but we have to use them in our gardens because there are hardly any Indian coins in circulation here," said a manager of a tea garden in northern Assam.

He is not willing to be named because the disclosure could cause legal complications for the estate.

'Do our best'

Indian revenue intelligence officials say millions of coins are finding their way into Bangladesh.

They say they have alerted the paramilitary Border Security Force (BSF) - which is deployed on the India-Bangladesh border - to check the smuggling.


Coins can even be seen 'for sale' in Guwahati market stalls

"We are aware of our coins going across the border in some quantities and we will do our best to stop it," senior BSF official SK Datta told the BBC.

Revenue intelligence officials, who do not wish to be named, say criminals can make five to six blades from a five-rupee coin.

"We are investigating this closely," said one official posted in north-eastern India.

Earlier, Indian coins were being melted in huge quantities in places like Calcutta.

The mints took corrective action - scaling down the metal content of the coins - but that has not stopped the shortages.

Distributing coins

The authorities have taken various steps to deal with the problem.

In Calcutta alone, India's central bank - the Reserve Bank of India - has distributed coins worth nearly six million rupees ($150,000) to overcome the shortage in the last two weeks, bank treasurer Nilanjan Saha said.

We have to accept very soiled notes of one or five rupees, so soiled that the banks will not change it

Agartala resident Sushil Choudhury

Long queues form outside the bank's regional office in the city centre every time this happens.

Unscrupulous touts set up makeshift shops and collect as many of the coins as they can, only to sell them later at a premium.

"We stand in long queues but the coins are finished within no time. Those in front pick them up and we can see some of them later selling the coins at a big margin," complained small trader Nitai Banik, who needs a lot of coins for his retail trade in small garments.

Begging coins

Shopkeepers ask customers to buy more to make it a round figure so that small change does not have to be given out.

"The shopkeepers give us toffees or cigarettes to make it a round figure," said student Debolina Sen.

In desperation, some shopkeepers have even turned to beggars to maintain their coin supplies.

The beggars get given coins by passers-by and then sell them on at a profit.


They are worth more melted down as razor blades

"They charge a smaller premium, much less compared to the touts outside the Reserve Bank," says businessman Tarun Jain.

The coin shortage is most acute in the north-eastern frontier town of Agartala, right on the border with Bangladesh and believed to be a major centre for contraband trade with Bangladesh.

Here, rickshaw pullers tell you that they cannot provide any coins in change because they have none left.

"So we have to accept very soiled notes of one or five rupees, so soiled that the banks will not change it," says Agartala resident Sushil Choudhury.

In Guwahati, Assam's capital and the business hub of India's northeast, small coins like 50 paisa have completely dropped out of circulation.
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Guest » Wed Jun 27, 2007 11:22 am

Goos get it all out now cos if i have to listen to this shit at the lan.............. :P
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Postby Manky » Wed Jun 27, 2007 11:31 am

Seriously goo that is a very interesting read ... who woulda though u could turn 1 rupee into 35 so easily
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Goose » Wed Jun 27, 2007 12:44 pm

Scotto01 wrote:Goos get it all out now cos if i have to listen to this shit at the lan.............. :P


Mate, you have no idea how many 'interesting' stories i have....
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Guest » Wed Jun 27, 2007 12:46 pm

mcguis wrote:
Scotto01 wrote:Goos get it all out now cos if i have to listen to this shit at the lan.............. :P


Mate, you have no idea how many 'interesting' stories i have....
:scared:
Nah mate just stirring
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Re: Something brief and interesting perhaps

Postby Goose » Wed Jun 27, 2007 1:03 pm

Here's another one for you.

Protests at Iran fuel rationing

There are reports three people died in the blaze in Tehran
At least one petrol station has been set on fire in the Iranian capital, Tehran, after the government announced fuel rationing for private motorists.
Iranians were given only two hours' notice of the move that limits private drivers to 100 litres of fuel a month.

Despite its huge energy reserves Iran lacks refining capacity, forcing it to import about 40% of its petrol.

Tehran is trying to rein in fuel consumption over fears of possible UN sanctions over its nuclear programme.

Iran fears the West could sanction its petrol imports and cripple its economy.

'Dangerous move'

The restrictions began at midnight local time on Wednesday (2030 GMT Tuesday).

The BBC's Frances Harrison in Tehran says there is anger and frustration the government did not give people more notice.


Iran's petrol is heavily subsidised, sold at about a fifth of its real cost
Eyewitnesses have seen at least one petrol station in the outskirts of the west of Tehran on fire and there are reports that three people died in the blaze.

All over the city there are huge queues and reports of scuffles at petrol stations as motorists try to beat the start of the rationing and fill their tanks.

Iran's petrol is heavily subsidised, sold at about a fifth of its real cost. So far there has been no announcement about whether Iranians can buy more petrol at the real market cost.

Our correspondent says rationing fuel is only likely to add to high inflation and the rising cost of living.

It is a dangerous move for any elected government, especially in an oil-rich country like Iran where people think cheap fuel is their birthright and public transport is very limited, she says.

The US, which is leading efforts to pressure Iran to suspend its uranium enrichment activities, has said Iran's fuel imports are a point of "leverage".

Washington and other Western nations accuse the Islamic Republic of seeking to build nuclear weapons.

Iran says its nuclear programme is entirely peaceful and is solely aimed at producing civilian nuclear power.

(This is only interesting because Iran can quite happily afford to build nuclear power stations but seemingly doesn't want to build any refineries)
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